Florida Adventures

Kayaking From King’s Landing

This post contains affiliate links and ads so I may receive a commission, at no cost to you, if you click on or make a purchase through one of these links.

Orlando is the home to multiple theme parks and attractions that draw people in from all over the world. However, there are plenty of other things to do in central Florida that don’t require standing in long lines or pushing through crowds. Consider taking a short drive out of town and enjoying one of the many natural springs scattered across the state. One of my favorites and closest springs can be accessed by kayaking from King’s Landing along Rock Springs Run.

Paddling down Rock Springs Run with a view from above.
Keep an eye out for the platform in one of the trees to snag a photo like this!

Location of King’s Landing

King’s Landing is located in Apopka just off the Kelly Park Road exit of 429. Heading east off the toll road for a few miles will land you at an intersection with tube rentals (more on that later). Turn down Kelly Park Road and you’ll eventually pass Kelly Park on your right. At the end of the road will be King’s Landing. Use this address to help you navigate to the entrance.

A view of Rock Springs Run taking a sharp turn through the lily pads.
One of the sections of Rock Springs Run that isn’t as shaded as the rest.
King’s Landing versus Rock Springs Run versus Wekiva River

It’s important to know the difference between all of these locations because they are easily confused. King’s Landing is a place to rent or launch kayaks, canoes and paddle boards that is about 2 miles from the mouth of Rock Spring. Kelly Park is where you can go to enjoy swimming and tubing closer to the mouth of Rock Spring. For both locations, you will be floating along what is called Rock Springs Run which eventually meets up with the Wekiwa Springs run. Both of these springs then make up the Wekiwa River.

A map showing the route from King's Landing to Wekiva Island.
An easy to read map that will guide you from King’s Landing to Wekiva Island. You will be provided this map when you pay for your rental.

Visiting the Wekiva River

Honestly, there is no wrong time to kayak from King’s Landing. Summer will obviously be more crowded with both Florida locals and tourists looking for a great way to cool off. Winter in central Florida can be cooler, but you’ll have the water mostly to yourself. I’d say the only thing to be conscious of is that in the summer, thunderstorms typically roll through in the afternoon. Get out on the water early and be prepared to hustle if the weather catches you off guard.

A low hanging oak tree juts out of the spring run.
One of my favorite spots along the run. If you are paddling with a SUP then make sure to duck!

Arriving at King’s Landing

Arriving at the gate of King’s Landing you can park in their driveway to unload your personal vessel or any other gear you have. Once unloaded, you will need to park outside the gates along the road. King’s Landing is open 7 days a week from 8 am to 5 pm. Check in at the office and make sure to grab a free beer from the cooler!

The gate to enter King's Landing from the main road.
The gate to King’s Landing. Drive in to unload any gear and then park along the road just outside of the gate.

Routes to take from King’s Landing

A skinny canal from the launch leads out to Rock Springs Run. Turning to the left will lead you down Rock Springs Run towards Wekiva Island. This route is with the current and is approximately 8.5 miles. This part of the run is beautiful and considered wild Florida. The water is still clear, but more of a brownish color because of the tannins. Keep your eyes peeled for a plethora of native wildlife like alligators, deer, and birds of prey. This journey will take you about 4.5 hours to reach Wekiva Island and a good portion of it is not shaded so plan accordingly!

The brownish water towards the end of the paddle due to the tannins.
The water remains clear, but more of a brownish color because of the tannins.

Going back to when you exit the canal, I recommend turning RIGHT regardless of if you intend to kayak from King’s Landing to Wekiva Island. If you paddle to the right you will be against the current, though not terribly difficult to handle. It’s about 2 miles to the “bridge” which usually takes me about 1 hour. This portion of Rock Springs Run is called the Emerald Cut which is ABSOLUTELY STUNNING and SHOULDN’T BE MISSED! The water is shallow in some parts so it’s safe to pull over and cool off.

Looking upstream at the a small lush island which is probably the most iconic part of Rock Springs Run.
The most picturesque spot along Rock Springs Run. Stop here to relax and enjoy the cool shallow water.

Kayaking from King’s Landing

*King’s Landing only accepts CASH and no reservations are needed so arrive early*

King’s Landing rents both kayaks and canoes as well as offer private tours. Boats can be rented for the entire run from King’s Landing to Wekiva Island. Prices start at $50 for a single kayak or double canoe and $60 for a double kayak. This price includes the kayak’s equipment as well as the return shuttle back to King’s Landing. This is a point to point paddle starting at King’s Landing and ending at Wekiva Island. You must be on the water by 11:00 am in order to make it to the pick-up point by 4:00 pm. In the summer, another pick-up time is added at 2:30 pm. I would suggest starting as early as possible. If you begin at 11:00 am you will not have enough time to do the Emerald Cut and make it to Wekiva Island in time.

A view of the skinny canal that leads from King's Landing towards Rock Springs Run.
The canal that leads from King’s Landing out onto Rock Springs Run. Make a RIGHT out of the canal to enjoy the crystal clear water before contuing down towards Wekiva Island.

Once you arrive at Wekiva Island, paddle past the beach area and make the first right. You’ll paddle just a bit longer and see a dock where you can pull your boats out of the water. This is the spot where you will catch the shuttle back to King’s Landing.

The ramp and pavilion which marks the pick up point at Wekiva Island.
The exit point after the paddle from King’s Landing to Wekiva Island.
Exploring just the Emerald Cut.

Another choice is to simply rent a kayak or canoe for a few hours and spend the entire time exploring the Emerald Cut. For this option, canoes are $30, single kayaks are $40 and doubles are $50 for the entire day.

A yellow kayak is an example of one of the vessels available to rent at King's Landing.
A shot of one of the kayaks that are available to rent at King’s Landing.
Launching your personal kayak or paddle board.

If you’d like to launch your own vessel at King’s Landing, it’s $10. If you’d like to utilize their return shuttle for the point to point paddle it’ll cost $20. The shuttle service will also transport personal kayaks and boards on their trailer. This is a huge perk if you plan to paddle alone! Drive time from Wekiva Island back to King’s Landing is about 20 minutes.

A view of a paddle board from above showing just how clear the water of Rock Springs Run is.
A stark contrast between the crystal clear water of Rock Springs Run and my gear packed stand up paddle board.

Rock Springs Run activities

Aside from kayaking from King’s Landing, you can also float along Rock Springs Run in an inner tube. As I mentioned before, you can rent tubes just before the entrance to Kelly Park at Rock Springs Bar and Grill. The tubes are already inflated and cost $7 to rent for the day. Arrive early to grab a tube and a place to park. Kelly Park typically reaches capacity on weekends and holidays.

A view from between two palm trees looking downstream.
Just another slice of paradise. Can you believe this is less than an hours drive from Orlando?

It is possible to bring your own tube as long as it is less than 5 feet in length. The price to get into Kelly Park is $3 per vehicle for 1-2 passengers or $5 per vehicle for 3-8 passengers. *I have not tubed from Kelly Park yet so none of my photos are from that portion of the run.*

Points of interest near King’s Landing

I feel like it is worth mentioning again: make sure to start early enough and take that RIGHT out of the canal to explore the Emerald Cut. Most of my photos are from this area because it is so gorgeous.

Looking down Rock Springs Run surrounded by a lush green forest.
Arrive early for a chance to enjoy the spring run all to yourself.
Hungry after your paddle?

Another highlight is grabbing some food and drinks at Wekiva Island. Whether you paddle the entire 8.5 miles kayaking from King’s Landing or only paddle around the Emerald Cut make sure to stop by! Wekiva Island is a perfect mix between Florida locals and tourists. There is a beach bar and a food truck as well as spots to hang out by the water.

People line the banks of Wekiva Island while they enjoy drinks and food.
Wekiva Island is a great place to grab a drink after a fun day kayaking from King’s Landing.
I hope you enjoy kayaking from King’s Landing! Check out some of my other favorite places to paddle in Florida or where to swim with manatees in the sunshine state!

I want to remind everyone that plans to paddle any of the springs in Florida to remember to NEVER discard anything (trash, plastic bottles, etc.) while enjoying these natural places and NEVER harass the wildlife. Let’s keep Florida WILD!

Check out my video below of paddling through the Emerald Cut of Rock Springs Run! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to drop those below or reach out to me on my Facebook Page!

My name is Bridget and Iā€™m so happy you stopped by. Iā€™m an average girl with a full-time job who has been traveling on and off for almost 10 years. I want to inspire you to get outdoors and travel by sharing some of my favorite adventures as well as tips, tricks, and itineraries. Everything from traveling across the world to my current location in central Florida, you can find it all here at impulse4adventure!

10 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

%d bloggers like this: